Universal Credit and the claimant count

This briefing paper explains how Universal Credit has increased the number of people claiming unemployment benefits, by requiring a broader group of claimants to look for work than was the case under Jobseeker’s Allowance. In January 2019, the Department for Work and Pensions published an ‘alternative’ claimant count for the first time. This models what the claimant count would have been if Universal Credit had been fully in place since 2013. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, June 2019

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. In the latest quarter, there was a fall in unemployment levels and the unemployment rate remains at its joint lowest level since comparable records began in 1971. Despite employment levels increasing, the employment rate fell slightly from the previous quarter. Average pay continued to grow faster than inflation, with pay excluding bonuses growing at its fastest rate since 2008. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, April 2019

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. The unemployment rate fell to its lowest rate since 1975 in the latest quarter, following another large fall in unemployment. There was also a large increase in employment, which was almost entirely driven by an increase for those who are self-employed. The employment rate remained at its joint-highest level since comparable records began in 1971. Average pay continued to grow faster than inflation. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, March 2018

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. There was a modest increase in employment and a small fall in unemployment over the past quarter. The rate of average earnings growth continued to increase, although annual growth in average earnings remained slightly below CPI inflation. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, April 2018

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. The UK employment rate climbed to a new record high of 75.6% in January-March 2018, the inactivity rate fell to a new record low of 21.0% and the unemployment rate was at its lowest level since 1975. Average weekly pay excluding bonuses grew slightly faster than prices for the first time in over a year, although there was slower growth in average pay including bonuses. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, September 2018

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. The unemployment rate of 4.0% in June-August 2018 was the joint lowest rate since 1975. Despite falling slightly from the last quarter, the employment rate remains at a very high level historically while the inactivity rate remains at a very low level. The growth in average weekly pay excluding bonuses (not adjusting for inflation) was the highest since January 2009. Despite this, after adjusting for inflation, earnings remain below levels seen before the 2008 downturn. Read more

People claiming unemployment benefits by constituency, August 2018

This paper provides figures for the number of people claiming unemployment benefits (the “claimant count”) by parliamentary constituency, as well as a summary of the latest labour market statistics for the UK as a whole. The unemployment rate of 4.0% in May-July 2018 was the joint lowest rate since 1975, while the employment rate remains at a very high level historically and the inactivity rate remains at a very low level. Average weekly pay both including and excluding bonuses grew faster than prices, although the growth in earnings remains relatively weak. Read more