The 2021 census asked people about their sexual orientation and gender identity, with the aim of producing data about the LGBT+ community. The dashboard on this page shows the results for constituencies in England and Wales. The data reflects the population on Census Day, 21 March 2021.

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How did the census ask about sexual orientation?

Census respondents aged 16 or over were asked a voluntary question about their sexual orientation.

Of the respondents in England and Wales, 3.2% identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or with another sexual orientation other than straight or heterosexual. This group is described as ‘LGB+’ on this page.

92.5% of respondents identified as straight or heterosexual, and 7.5% chose not to answer the question.

How did the census ask about gender identity?

Respondents aged 16 or over were also asked “Is the gender you identify with the same as your sex registered at birth?”.

Respondents could answer yes or no, and specify what their gender identity was if their answer was no.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which runs the census, has said that by gender identity it means “a person’s sense of their own gender, whether male, female, or another category such as non-binary”.

About 0.5% of people in England and Wales said their gender identity was different from the sex they were registered with at birth, with a range of different responses. About 0.2% gave their gender identity as trans man or trans woman. Another 0.2% did not write in a gender identity. Around 0.1% had another gender identity, such as non-binary.

The ONS has carried out research into the quality of its results on gender identity, and says there are “higher levels of uncertainty” in these results (see the notes section below for more on this).

Explore constituency data

Use the dropdown menu below to select the constituency you’re interested in and view statistics on the population.

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Top 20 constituencies 

In the table below, you can see the constituencies with the highest proportions of people with LGB+ identities, and the highest proportions of people with a different gender identity from their sex registered at birth.

The constituencies with the largest proportions of LGB+ people were in areas including Brighton & Hove, London, and Manchester.

London also had several constituencies with the highest proportions of people with a different gender identity from their sex registered at birth, as did places in Manchester, Leeds and the Midlands.

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Download all data in Excel (3.1 MB)

If you would like to access this information in an alternative format please email papers@parliament.uk and we will review your request.


Sources

ONS, 2021 Census, Tables TS077 and TS078

Notes

The ONS published research into the quality of its gender identity statistics in November 2023. It concluded that there are “higher levels of uncertainty” in its estimates of gender identity compared with other census topics.

The ONS found that people who said their gender identity was different from their sex registered at birth were more likely to also say they did not speak English well.

The ONS says that this trend could mean that “some respondents [were] not interpreting the question as intended”, but that the pattern “could also be affected by other considerations” (such as trans people choosing to move to the UK from overseas).

The ONS also notes that there is further uncertainty in the gender identity variable because it is intended to capture a relatively small population, so any errors or bias have a larger effect on the results.

The number of people who chose not to answer the question on gender identity at all was around 10 times higher than the number who responded that their gender identity was different from their sex registered at birth. The ONS says that this means “we cannot say whether the census estimates are likely to be an overestimate or an underestimate of the true value”.

We advise keeping this in mind when interpreting the statistics on gender identity, particularly in areas with larger populations of people who do not speak English well.

Data updates

This dashboard uses 2021 census data. The 2021 census is currently the only source of constituency-level data on this topic, which means that there aren’t any updates planned for the near future.

2021 census results and analysis

Constituency data and analysis on the 2021 census results from the Commons Library.

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