Now the magic of Roald Dahl is brought to life in these new illustrated paperback editions from the imagination of Quentin Blake, Roald Dahl’s own favourite illustrator.

Flavour Size Colour
Strawberry small pink
Chocolate large “Welcome, my little friends! Welcome to the factory!”
Mint Green big

“Welcome, my little friends! Welcome to the factory!”

For Charlie Bucket, life isn’t very easy. He and his mother and father live in a very small house with Charlie’s four grandparents who all share one bed between them. There isn’t much to eat besides cabbage soup and not even very much of that. What Charlie really longs for, is chocolate and not just any chocolate but Willy Wonka’s chocolate, made in the chocolate factory Charlie can almost see from his house.

Mr Wonka is a mystery a conundrum one day he was there and the next day he suddenly vanished and nobody has been into his factory or cast eyes upon him ever since. Now Mr Wonka has offered five lucky children the chance to step inside the factory, five Golden Tickets hidden inside five bars of chocolate. All Charlie needs is one tiny, near-impossible stroke of luck.

Find out more about Roald Dahl

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Tuesday, 09 April, 2019

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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

For Charlie Bucket, life isn’t very easy. He and his mother and father live in a very small house with Charlie’s four grandparents who all share one bed between them. There isn’t much to eat besides cabbage soup and not even very much of that

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One of Britain’s finest living illustrators

Quentin Blake has put pictures to more than three hundred books and was Roald Dahl’s favourite illustrator.

  • a number of bestselling children’s books including The Green Ship and Angelica Sprocket’s Pockets. In 1999 he became the first ever Children’s Laureate and in 2013 he was knighted for services to illustration.

  • Prioritising coronavirus testing in high-risk areas has led to shortages in other places, leading to some people with symptoms being asked to drive more than 100 miles for a swab.

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Waterstones gives you a golden ticket

o step inside the magical world of Willy Wonka. Join gum-chewing Violet Beauregarde, television obsessed Mike Teavee, greedy Augustus Gloop, spoiled Veruca Salt and Charlie himself of course as they sample the delights of the chocolate-maker’s world.

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Now the magic of Roald Dahl is brought to life in these new illustrated paperback editions from the imagination of Quentin Blake, Roald Dahl’s own favourite illustrator.

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See how spooky it is

This page provides constituency statistics on Universal Credit in Great Britain, including our estimate of how far caseload rollout has progressed to date.

Universal Credit (UC) replaces six ‘legacy’ benefits and tax credits for working-age households. The Government first launched UC in 2013 and completed the delivery rollout of the UC Full Service to all jobcentres in Great Britain by the end of 2018.

It currently expects all households claiming legacy benefits and tax credits to have moved across to UC by September 2024. This expansion of UC across the target population of working-age households receiving means-tested support is what we call caseload rollout.

Find which constituency you live in
Use the dropdown menu below to select the constituency you’re interested in and view key statistics.

How do we measure caseload rollout?

Universal Credit is the replacement for six legacy benefits and tax credits:

Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
Income-related Employment and Support Allowance
Income Support
Housing Benefit for working-age claimants
Child Tax Credit
Working Tax Credit
Households who are receiving legacy benefits and/or tax credits continue to receive these unless and until:

they have a significant change of circumstance triggering a new claim for UC (this is natural migration to UC), or
their circumstances don’t change but the DWP moves them across to UC (a process called managed migration. Since July 2019 the DWP has been running a pilot of this process, called ‘Move to UC’, at Harrogate Jobcentre.
The varying pace of UC delivery rollout to jobcentres across Great Britain by the end of 2018 means that the proportion of households who are on UC rather than the legacy system currently varies from area to area. The ongoing pace of caseload rollout will depend on the rate at which households close their legacy claims and open UC claims, or are moved across as part of managed migration.

We measure the progress of UC caseload rollout in an area by comparing the number of households claiming UC in an area with our estimate of the total number of households still in the legacy system. Our estimate is based on the following data on legacy benefit caseloads:

In-work households

Child and Working Tax Credits for in-work households [source: HMRC Tax Credit provisional awards geographical analysis]
Out-of-work households

Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA)
Income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)
Income Support
Housing Benefit: claimants aged 16-64 who are not in employment and not ‘passported’ (i.e. not receiving any of the three means-tested out-of-work benefits listed above [all sourced from DWP Stat-xplore]
For the most recent months, when the latest statistics on legacy benefits typically lag behind Universal Credit household statistics, we estimate how much the legacy estimate has declined over the period based on the expected completion date of caseload rollout. Note that our latest estimates of legacy benefit caseloads are subject to future revision as and when new caseload statistics are published by the DWP and HMRC.

Data updates
We aim to update most aspects of this dashboard monthly, in line with data releases from HMRC and the Department for Work and Pensions, but the data shown here may not be the latest available. MPs and their staff can contact the Commons Library with queries about updates.

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