Constituency data: broadband coverage and speeds

This page has constituency-level data on broadband connectivity. You can also download a map for each constituency showing postcode-level data on the percentage of premises unable to receive the UK Government’s proposed Universal Service Obligation (USO). The proposed USO is that everyone should have access to download speeds of at least 10 Mbps and upload speeds of at least 1 Mbps.

Single constituency

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Compare constituencies

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Notes

In larger constituencies, postcode maps can be very crowded. Maps of smaller areas can be provided to MPs and their staff on request.

Definitions of measures:

  • Superfast Availability: the percentage of lines that are capable of receiving speeds of at least 30 Mbps (Ofcom’s definition of ‘superfast’ – the UK Government instead uses 24 Mbps as its definition). Superfast availability doesn’t mean that all lines are actually receiving superfast speeds, because this often requires consumers to subscribe to specific packages.
  • Full Fibre: this technology extends the fibre network to the customer premises and is capable of delivering ‘ultrafast’ speeds (defined by Ofcom as 300 Mbps).
  • Below USO (Universal Service Obligation): premises unable to receive 10 Mbps download speed or 1 Mbps upload speed, which Ofcom regards as necessary components of ‘decent broadband’, and which represents the threshold for the UK Government’s proposed Universal Service Obligation.
  • Receiving under 2/10 Mbps: the percentage of premises whose lines aren’t capable of receiving these speeds.
  • Average download speed: speeds actually being received. This may in part reflect consumer choice, since users sometimes have access to packages offering higher speeds than those they are actually receiving.

Sources

Ofcom, Connected nations 2017 and Connected nations update: spring 2018