• Research Briefing

    Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill – the abolition of the Police Negotiating Board

    Clauses 112-115 of the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill 2013-2014 would abolish the Police Negotiating Board, the current negotiating forum for police pay, and replace it with a new Police Remuneration Review Body. The Bill would take forward proposals in the final report of the Independent Review of Police Officer and Staff Remuneration and Conditions (the Winsor Review). This note outlines the historical background of the Police Negotiating Board, the relevant recommendations of the Winsor Review and the Government’s response to it.

  • Research Briefing

    The duty of the police to enforce the law

    There is case law to suggest that, although under a general duty to uphold the law, chief officers of police retain discretion as to the degree of effort they will attach to enforcing any particular law at any particular time.

  • Research Briefing

    Police (Complaints and Conduct) Bill

    This Bill is due to go through all its Commons stages under the Fast-Track procedure on 5 December 2012. It would make two changes to the powers of the Independent Police Complaints Commission. These are designed to enable the Commission to investigate allegations against the police in relation to the Hillsborough disaster. The Bill has reportedly been welcomed by the Opposition. It extends to England and Wales, and parts of it extend to the whole UK.

  • Research Briefing

    Police and Crime Commissioner Elections, 2012

    On Thursday 15 November 2012 the first ever elections for Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) took place in England and Wales, outside of London. The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 replaced police authorities with directly elected PCCs. The 41 police areas each elected one PCC. The supplementary vote system was used for the elections. This Research Paper analyses the results

  • Research Briefing

    Police Pay – Booth review (2008–2011 pay deal)

    Since 1979 annual pay increases for police officers have been determined under a formula linked to an annual survey of settlement levels for non-manual employees in the private sector. In 2006 this led to a recommendation of a 3% pay increase that Home Office officials and management representatives did not agree to. This led to a dispute over police pay that lasted until October 2008, when a multi-year pay settlement was reached by the Police Negotiating Board for police officers in England & Wales. The three-year deal was backdated to 1 September 2008 and will run through to 31 August 2011.

  • Research Briefing

    Police pay and conditions: Winsor Review

    In October 2010, the Home Secretary, Theresa May, announced the “most comprehensive review of police pay and conditions in more than 30 years”. The independent review covering England and Wales was led to Tom Winsor, the former Rail Regulator. In March 2011, Mr Winsor published his first report, which “covered short-term improvements to remuneration and terms and conditions”.

  • Research Briefing

    Policing riots

    This note looks at the possible roles of the police and armed forces in controlling riots. A separate Library standard note 6048 deals with compensation and insurance for those affected by riots.

  • Research Briefing

    Police (Detention and Bail) Bill

    This Research Paper has been prepared for the Commons stages of the Police (Detention and Bail) Bill, which is being fast-tracked and is due to undergo all of its remaining Commons stages on 7 July 2011. The Bill would reverse the effect of the High Court’s recent decision in the Hookway case, in which it held that the “detention clock” limiting the period that the police can hold a suspect for without charge continued to run when the suspect was released on bail

  • Research Briefing

    Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill Committee Stage Report [Bill 151 of 2010-11]

    During the Committee stage, several Government amendments were made to the provisions on police reform. Some (for example, on police complaints, police and crime plans and disqualifying people convicted of imprisonable offences from becoming or being police and crime commissioners) were on matters of substance. By contrast, there were only minor amendments to the provisions of the misuse of drugs and no substantive amendments to the parts of the Bill covering licensing, protests in Parliament Square or universal jurisdiction.

  • Research Briefing

    Protection of Freedoms Bill [Bill 146 of 2010-11]

    This briefing on the Protection of Freedoms Bill was prepared for the House of Commons Second Reading debate. The Bill forms part of the Coalition Government's programme to “implement a full programme of measures to reverse the substantial erosion of civil liberties and roll back state intrusion”, and follows the passing of the Identity Documents Act 2010, which abolished identity cards. The Bill introduces a wide range of measures including the a new framework for police retention of fingerprints and DNA data, a requirement for schools to get parents’ consent before processing children’s biometric information, a new regime for police stops and searches under the Terrorism Act 2000 and the reduction of the maximum pre-charge detention period under that Act from 28 to 14 days. It also restricts the scope of the 'vetting and barring' scheme for protecting vulnerable groups and makes changes to the system of criminal records checks.