Oil Prices

Spot oil prices were around $75 per barrel in early July 2021. They crashed after the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdown led to a dramatic cut in demand. Prices fell from almost $70 a barrel in early January to below $20 per barrel in late April 2020. Oil prices peaked in July 2008 at almost $150 per barrel and were in the $100-125 range for much of 2011 to early 2014.

Oil Prices

Petrol and diesel prices

Average mid-June prices for petrol and diesel were 129.5 and 133.2 pence per litre respectively. They fell rapidly after the coronavirus outbreak largely due to sharp drops in oil prices. Since the first lockdown prices have increased again and are now above their immediate pre-pandemic levels. The UK had the 10th highest petrol and 2nd highest diesel prices in the EU+UK.

Petrol and diesel prices
  • Research Briefing

    Student loan statistics

    Student loans are the main method of direct government support for higher education students. More than £17 billion is loaned to students each year. The value of outstanding loans at the end of March 2021 reached £160 billion. The Government forecasts the value of outstanding loans to be around £560 billion (2019‑20 prices) by the middle of this century. The expansion of loans has raised questions about graduate repayments and ultimately the cost of the system to the taxpayer

  • Research Briefing

    Equality of access and outcomes in higher education in England

    How likely are different groups of young people to go to higher education? When they get there how likely are they to continue to the end of their course and get 'top' grades? How do earnings and employment vary between these groups? This paper looks at equality in undergraduate education in England. It summarises the latest data on access and outcomes before looking at Government policy, the role of the Office for Students, and the actions and responsibilities of universities.

  • Research Briefing

    Oxbridge ‘elitism’

    For the last two decades both Oxford and Cambridge have taken more than half of their entrants from state schools. The latest rates are 67% for Oxford and 68% for Cambridge, or somewhat higher if overseas students at UK schools are excluded. These rates have generally increased over the past few decades, with particularly large increase in the last two years, but the historical data shows that progress has been slow. At the end of the 1920s around 20% of entrants to both universities started their education at a state school. In the late 1930s there rates were 24% at Oxford and 19% at Cambridge started their education at a state school. By the early 1950s these rates had increased to 43% and 34% respectively. In the early 1960s 34% of students at Oxford and 27% at Cambridge came from state secondary schools

  • Research Briefing

    Further education funding in England

    The further education (FE) funding system in England is complex and has undergone a number of changes in recent years. Currently, FE providers are allocated funds from different sources depending on the type of courses they provide and on the age of their students; most funding follows the learner. There is also capital funding available for upgrading the college estate. This briefing explains the different systems, examines recent funding announcements and trends, and considers some related issues facing the FE sector.

  • Research Briefing

    Funding for healthcare students in England

    This House of Commons briefing paper outlines the current funding system for: healthcare students, medical and dentistry students and paramedics and discusses the impact of the 2017 reforms on entrants to healthcare degrees. It also outlines new funding arrangements for nursing, midwifery, healthcare students and paramedics from September 2020.

  • Research Briefing

    Part-time undergraduate students in England

    This House of Commons briefing note gives and overview of the current position of part-time undergraduate education in England. It gives an overview of the numbers of part-time students, the decline in part-time students and discusses the reasons for the decline and the impact on the higher education sector.

  • Research Briefing

    Higher education student numbers

    Headline student numbers have increased to new records following a short dip after to the 2012 reforms. There are however ongoing concerns about numbers outside this group where trends have not been so positive, including part-time undergraduates, some postgraduates students, overseas students from some countries( especially Malaysia, Ireland, Cyprus and Germany) mature students and some disadvantaged groups. There is also considerable concern about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and student numbers, particularly those from overseas and uncertainty about the impact of Brexit on EU student numbers.

Total results (page 1 of 12)